第012章 父与子
大耳朵英语  http://www.bigear.cn  2008-05-08 15:44:16  【打印
The Count of Monte Cristo

Chapter 12 Father and Son



M. NOIRTIER--for it was, indeed, he who entered--looked after the servant until the door was closed, and then, fearing, no doubt, that he might be overheard in the ante-chamber, he opened the door again, nor was the precaution useless, as appeared from the rapid retreat of Germain, who proved that he was not exempt from the sin which ruined our first parents. M. Noirtier then took the trouble to close and bolt the ante-chamber door, then that of the bed-chamber, and then extended his hand to Villefort, who had followed all his motions with surprise which he could not conceal.

"Well, now, my dear Gérard," said he to the young man, with a very significant look, "do you know, you seem as if you were not very glad to see me?"

"My dear father," said Villefort, "I am, on the contrary, delighted; but I so little expected your visit, that it has somewhat overcome me."

"But, my dear fellow," replied M. Noirtier, seating himself, "I might say the same thing to you, when you announce to me your wedding for the 28th of February, and on the 3rd of March you turn up here in Paris."

"And if I have come, my dear father," said Gérard, drawing closer to M. Noirtier, "do not complain, for it is for you that I came, and my journey will be your salvation."

"Ah, indeed!" said M. Noirtier, stretching himself out at his ease in the chair. "Really, pray tell me all about it, for it must be interesting."

"Father, you have heard speak of a certain Bonapartist club in the Rue Saint-Jacques?"

"No. 53; yes, I am vice-president."

"Father, your coolness makes me shudder."

"Why, my dear boy, when a man has been proscribed by the mountaineers, has escaped from Paris in a hay-cart, been hunted over the plains of Bordeaux by Robespierre's bloodhounds, he becomes accustomed to most things. But go on, what about the club in the Rue Saint-Jacques?"

"Why, they induced General Quesnel to go there, and General Quesnel, who quitted his own house at nine o'clock in the evening, was found the next day in the Seine."

"And who told you this fine story?"

"The king himself."

"Well, then, in return for your story," continued Noirtier, "I will tell you another."

"My dear father, I think I already know what you are about to tell me."

"Ah, you have heard of the landing of the emperor?"

"Not so loud, father, I entreat of you--for your own sake as well as mine. Yes, I heard this news, and knew it even before you could; for three days ago I posted from Marseilles to Paris with all possible speed, half-desperate at the enforced delay."

"Three days ago? You are crazy. Why, three days ago the emperor had not landed."

"No matter, I was aware of his intention."

"How did you know about it?"

"By a letter addressed to you from the Island of Elba."

"To me?"

"To you; and which I discovered in the pocket-book of the messenger. Had that letter fallen into the hands of another, you, my dear father, would probably ere this have been shot." Villefort's father laughed.

"Come, come," said he, "will the Restoration adopt imperial methods so promptly? Shot, my dear boy? What an idea! Where is the letter you speak of? I know you too well to suppose you would allow such a thing to pass you."

"I burnt it, for fear that even a fragment should remain; for that letter must have led to your condemnation."

"And the destruction of your future prospects," replied Noirtier; "yes, I can easily comprehend that. But I have nothing to fear while I have you to protect me."

"I do better than that, sir--I save you."

"You do? Why, really, the thing becomes more and more dramatic--explain yourself."

"I must refer again to the club in the Rue Saint-Jacques."

"It appears that this club is rather a bore to the police. Why didn't they search more vigilantly? they would have found"--

"They have not found; but they are on the track."

"Yes, that the usual phrase; I am quite familiar with it. When the police is at fault, it declares that it is on the track; and the government patiently awaits the day when it comes to say, with a sneaking air, that the track is lost."

"Yes, but they have found a corpse; the general has been killed, and in all countries they call that a murder."

"A murder do you call it? why, there is nothing to prove that the general was murdered. People are found every day in the Seine, having thrown themselves in, or having been drowned from not knowing how to swim."

"Father, you know very well that the general was not a man to drown himself in despair, and people do not bathe in the Seine in the month of January. No, no, do not be deceived; this was murder in every sense of the word."

"And who thus designated it?"

"The king himself."

"The king! I thought he was philosopher enough to allow that there was no murder in politics. In politics, my dear fellow, you know, as well as I do, there are no men, but ideas--no feelings, but interests; in politics we do not kill a man, we only remove an obstacle, that is all. Would you like to know how matters have progressed? Well, I will tell you. It was thought reliance might be placed in General Quesnel; he was recommended to us from the Island of Elba; one of us went to him, and invited him to the Rue Saint-Jacques, where he would find some friends. He came there, and the plan was unfolded to him for leaving Elba, the projected landing, etc. When he had heard and comprehended all to the fullest extent, he replied that he was a royalist. Then all looked at each other,--he was made to take an oath, and did so, but with such an ill grace that it was really tempting Providence to swear him, and yet, in spite of that, the general was allowed to depart free--perfectly free. Yet he did not return home. What could that mean? why, my dear fellow, that on leaving us he lost his way, that's all. A murder? really, Villefort, you surprise me. You, a deputy procureur, to found an accusation on such bad premises! Did I ever say to you, when you were fulfilling your character as a royalist, and cut off the head of one of my party, 'My son, you have committed a murder?' No, I said, 'Very well, sir, you have gained the victory; to-morrow, perchance, it will be our turn.'"

"But, father, take care; when our turn comes, our revenge will be sweeping."

"I do not understand you."

"You rely on the usurper's return?"

"We do."

"You are mistaken; he will not advance two leagues into the interior of France without being followed, tracked, and caught like a wild beast."

"My dear fellow, the emperor is at this moment on the way to Grenoble; on the 10th or 12th he will be at Lyons, and on the 20th or 25th at Paris."

"The people will rise."

"Yes, to go and meet him."

"He has but a handful of men with him, and armies will be despatched against him."

"Yes, to escort him into the capital. Really, my dear Gérard, you are but a child; you think yourself well informed because the telegraph has told you, three days after the landing, 'The usurper has landed at Cannes with several men. He is pursued.' But where is he? what is he doing? You do not know at all, and in this way they will chase him to Paris, without drawing a trigger."

"Grenoble and Lyons are faithful cities, and will oppose to him an impassable barrier."

"Grenoble will open her gates to him with enthusiasm--all Lyons will hasten to welcome him. Believe me, we are as well informed as you, and our police are as good as your own. Would you like a proof of it? well, you wished to conceal your journey from me, and yet I knew of your arrival half an hour after you had passed the barrier. You gave your direction to no one but your postilion, yet I have your address, and in proof I am here the very instant you are going to sit at table. Ring, then, if you please, for a second knife, fork, and plate, and we will dine together."

"Indeed!" replied Villefort, looking at his father with astonishment, "you really do seem very well informed."

"Eh? the thing is simple enough. You who are in power have only the means that money produces--we who are in expectation, have those which devotion prompts."

"Devotion!" said Villefort, with a sneer.

"Yes, devotion; for that is, I believe, the phrase for hopeful ambition."

And Villefort's father extended his hand to the bell-rope, to summon the servant whom his son had not called. Villefort caught his arm.

"Wait, my dear father," said the young man, "one word more."

"Say on."

"However stupid the royalist police may be, they do know one terrible thing."

"What is that?"

"The description of the man who, on the morning of the day when General Quesnel disappeared, presented himself at his house."

"Oh, the admirable police have found that out, have they? And what may be that description?"

"Dark complexion; hair, eyebrows, and whiskers, black; blue frock-coat, buttoned up to the chin; rosette of an officer of the Legion of Honor in his button-hole; a hat with wide brim, and a cane."

"Ah, ha, that's it, is it?" said Noirtier; "and why, then, have they not laid hands on him?"

"Because yesterday, or the day before, they lost sight of him at the corner of the Rue Coq-Héron."

"Didn't I say that your police were good for nothing?"

"Yes; but they may catch him yet."

"True," said Noirtier, looking carelessly around him, "true, if this person were not on his guard, as he is;" and he added with a smile, "He will consequently make a few changes in his personal appearance." At these words he rose, and put off his frock-coat and cravat, went towards a table on which lay his son's toilet articles, lathered his face, took a razor, and, with a firm hand, cut off the compromising whiskers. Villefort watched him with alarm not devoid of admiration.

His whiskers cut off, Noirtier gave another turn to his hair; took, instead of his black cravat, a colored neckerchief which lay at the top of an open portmanteau; put on, in lieu of his blue and high-buttoned frock-coat, a coat of Villefort's of dark brown, and cut away in front; tried on before the glass a narrow-brimmed hat of his son's, which appeared to fit him perfectly, and, leaving his cane in the corner where he had deposited it, he took up a small bamboo switch, cut the air with it once or twice, and walked about with that easy swagger which was one of his principal characteristics.

"Well," he said, turning towards his wondering son, when this disguise was completed, "well, do you think your police will recognize me now."

"No, father," stammered Villefort; "at least, I hope not."

"And now, my dear boy," continued Noirtier, "I rely on your prudence to remove all the things which I leave in your care."

"Oh, rely on me," said Villefort.

"Yes, yes; and now I believe you are right, and that you have really saved my life; be assured I will return the favor hereafter." Villefort shook his head.

"You are not convinced yet?"

"I hope at least, that you may be mistaken."

"Shall you see the king again?"

"Perhaps."

"Would you pass in his eyes for a prophet?"

"Prophets of evil are not in favor at the court, father."

"True, but some day they do them justice; and supposing a second restoration, you would then pass for a great man."

"Well, what should I say to the king?"

"Say this to him: 'Sire, you are deceived as to the feeling in France, as to the opinions of the towns, and the prejudices of the army; he whom in Paris you call the Corsican ogre, who at Nevers is styled the usurper, is already saluted as Bonaparte at Lyons, and emperor at Grenoble. You think he is tracked, pursued, captured; he is advancing as rapidly as his own eagles. The soldiers you believe to be dying with hunger, worn out with fatigue, ready to desert, gather like atoms of snow about the rolling ball as it hastens onward. Sire, go, leave France to its real master, to him who acquired it, not by purchase, but by right of conquest; go, sire, not that you incur any risk, for your adversary is powerful enough to show you mercy, but because it would be humiliating for a grandson of Saint Louis to owe his life to the man of Arcola, Marengo, Austerlitz.' Tell him this, Gérard; or, rather, tell him nothing. Keep your journey a secret; do not boast of what you have come to Paris to do, or have done; return with all speed; enter Marseilles at night, and your house by the back-door, and there remain, quiet, submissive, secret, and, above all, inoffensive; for this time, I swear to you, we shall act like powerful men who know their enemies. Go, my son--go, my dear Gérard, and by your obedience to my paternal orders, or, if you prefer it, friendly counsels, we will keep you in your place. This will be," added Noirtier, with a smile, "one means by which you may a second time save me, if the political balance should some day take another turn, and cast you aloft while hurling me down. Adieu, my dear Gérard, and at your next journey alight at my door." Noirtier left the room when he had finished, with the same calmness that had characterized him during the whole of this remarkable and trying conversation. Villefort, pale and agitated, ran to the window, put aside the curtain, and saw him pass, cool and collected, by two or three ill-looking men at the corner of the street, who were there, perhaps, to arrest a man with black whiskers, and a blue frock-coat, and hat with broad brim.

Villefort stood watching, breathless, until his father had disappeared at the Rue Bussy. Then he turned to the various articles he had left behind him, put the black cravat and blue frock-coat at the bottom of the portmanteau, threw the hat into a dark closet, broke the cane into small bits and flung it in the fire, put on his travelling-cap, and calling his valet, checked with a look the thousand questions he was ready to ask, paid his bill, sprang into his carriage, which was ready, learned at Lyons that Bonaparte had entered Grenoble, and in the midst of the tumult which prevailed along the road, at length reached Marseilles, a prey to all the hopes and fears which enter into the heart of man with ambition and its first successes.



基督山伯爵

第十二章 父与子





诺瓦蒂埃先生因为进来的人的确就是他,用他的眼睛一直跟随着那仆人,一直看到他把门关上,然后,他又走过去把门打开了,无疑他是怕外客厅里有人偷听,这个预防倒并非没用,因为,从茄曼的突然退下这个行动上来看,他显然也犯了我们的始祖因之而堕落的原罪。诺瓦蒂埃先生不怕麻烦地小心地去关上了外客厅的门,又关上了卧室的门,然后才把他的手伸给了维尔福,而后者正带着惊魂未定的神色在呆呆地注视着他的一举一动。

“啊,我亲爱的杰拉尔,”来客对青年说道,并深情地望了他一眼,“你知道么,看样子你似乎并不十分高兴看到我?”

“我亲爱的父亲,”维尔福说,“我,恰恰相反,我是很高兴的,只是我没想到您会来,父亲,所以吃了一惊。”

“可是,我亲爱的朋友,”诺瓦蒂埃先生一边说,一边找了一个地方坐了下来,“我倒正想对你说这句话,因为你告诉我说你是在二月二十八日订婚,而三月三日却已到了巴黎这儿了。”

“我亲爱的父亲,”杰拉尔说着,一面把椅子拉近了诺瓦蒂埃先生,“就算我来了,您也不必抱怨,因为我是为您而来的,我这次来也许能救您的命呢。”

“啊,真的吗!”诺瓦蒂埃先生已舒舒服服地躺在椅子里了。“真的,请讲给我听听,法官先生,这一定很有趣。”

“父亲,您听说过圣杰克司街有一个拿破仑党俱乐部吗?”

“不错,在五十三号,我就是该俱乐部的副主席。”

“父亲,您的镇定简直使我有点儿害怕了。”

“噢,我的好孩子,一个曾被山岳党所放逐,曾躲在干草车里逃出了巴黎,被罗伯斯庇尔的暗探在波尔多的旷野里追逐过的人,他对很多事情都早已习惯了。请往下说吧,圣杰克司街的俱乐部怎么了?”

“哦,他们引诱奎斯尔将军去那里,奎斯奈尔将军是在晚上九点钟离家的,次日在赛纳河里被人发现的。”

“这个故事是谁告诉你的?”

“国王亲自告诉我的。”

“那么好吧,作为对你的故事的回报,”诺瓦蒂埃又说,“我也讲个故事给你听听。”

“我亲爱的父亲,我想,我已经知道您要告诉我的是什么了。”

“哦,你已听到皇帝陛下登陆的消息了?”

“别这么大声,父亲,我求求您,——为了您自己也为了我。是的,我听说这个消息了,甚至比您还早就听说了。三天以前,我以最快的速度,几乎拼命似的从马赛赶到巴黎来,因为我恨不得把我脑子里的所苦恼着的一个念头一下子就送到六百里以外去。”

“三天以前!你疯啦?三天以前圣上还没有登陆呢。”

“那没有关系,我早已知道他的计划了。”

“你是怎么知道的””

“从一封由厄尔巴岛发出的送给您的信上知道的。”

“给我的信?”

“是给您的,我是在那送信人的笔记本里发现的。要是那封信落到了别人的手里,您我亲爱的父亲呀,您这个时候大概早已被枪毙啦。”

维尔福的父亲大笑起来。“嗯,嗯,”他说,“看来昏君倒也从圣上那儿学到了速断速决的方法了。枪毙!我的好孩子!你这个刑罚执行得太快了吧。你所说的这封信在哪儿?我非常了解你的为人,我想你是不会让这样的一件东西随便乱扔的吧。”

“我把它给烧了,就怕留下只字片言,因为那封信简直就是您的判决书。”

“而且还会断送你的前程,”诺瓦蒂埃说道,“是的,这一点我倒不难理解。既然有你来保护我我就什么都不必怕了。”

“我不仅仅是保护了您,先生,我救了您的命!”

“是吗?咦,事情真是愈来愈戏剧化了,请你再说说看!”

“我得再回到圣杰克司街那个俱乐部的话题上去。”

“看来这俱乐部倒颇使警务部头痛。那他们为什么不再仔细地搜一搜呢?他们会找到——”

“他们没有找到,但他们已经有线索了。”

“不过那是老生常谈,这句话的意思我知道得很清楚。当警务部没有办法的时候,他们就宣称已经有线索了,于是政府就耐心地等着,直等到有一天,他们说象一溜青烟一样,那个线索失踪了。”

“不错,但他们找到了一具尸体,奎斯奈尔将军被害了,而在世界各国,他们都称那是一次谋杀。”

“谋杀!你是这样认为吗?咦,根本没有任何证据可以证明将军是被谋杀的呀。赛纳河里每天都可能捞到死人,或是自己跳下去的,或是因为不会游泳而淹死的。”

“父亲,您知道得很清楚,将军并不是一个会因绝望而跳水自杀的人,大正月里也不会有人在赛纳河里洗澡。不,不!不要弄错了,这次的死明明是一次谋杀。”

“这是谁定性的?”

“国王亲自说的。”

“国王!我还当他是一个哲学家,能懂得政治上并无谋杀这件事呢。亲爱的,你我都知道得很清楚,在政治上,是没有人的存在的,只有主义,没有感情可言,只有利害。在政治上,我们不是杀了一个人,而是除去了一个障碍。你想不想知道实情?好吧,我来告诉你。最初大家都很信赖奎斯奈尔将军,他是厄尔巴岛方面介绍来的。我们中有人到他那儿去邀请他到圣杰克司街去,请他去见几个朋友。他去了,大家就把计划告诉了他,如何离开厄尔巴岛,在什么时间登陆等等。当他知道了详情以后,他回答说,他是一个保皇党。当时大家都面面相觑,我们叫他发誓保守秘密,他发了个誓,但口是心非,以致真的激怒了上天来显灵报应!尽管如此,大家还是让将军自由地离开了,完全让他自由了。可是他却没回家。让我怎么说呢?

唉,亲爱的,很可能他在离开我们之后,他迷了路。你说谋杀!

真的,维尔福,你太令我吃惊了!你,一个代理检察官,竟如此捕风捉影地给人定罪!当你为王宅尽忠,把我党的一个成员杀头的时候,我是否对你说过,‘我的儿子,你犯了谋杀罪啦?’没有,我只是说,‘好极了,先生,你得胜了,明天,说不定,胜利又是我们的了。”

“但是,父亲,要注意,当我们胜利了的时候,我们的报复可是铁面无情的。”

“我不懂你的意思。”

“您是在指望逆贼复位吗?”

“我们是这样想的。”

“您错啦,他在法国境内还走不出五里路,就会被跟踪,追逐的,象一只野兽那样被抓住的。”

“我亲爱的朋友,圣上这个时候已在格勒诺布尔的路上了。十一、二日他就会到达里昂,而在二十日或二十五日到达巴黎。”

“人民会起来——”

“是的,起来迎接他的。”

“他只带了几个人来,而我们会派军队去剿灭他的。”

“是的,他们会护送他进首都的。真的,我亲爱的杰拉尔,你只是个小孩子,你自以为消息很灵通,因为有一份急报在皇上登陆后对你说,‘逆贼携随从数人于戛纳登陆,已在追逐中。’那么他现在在哪儿?在干些什么?恐怕你一点都不知道吧。他在被追逐中,你所知道的仅此而已。妙极了,象这样,他们可以不费一枪一弹就把他直追到巴黎来。”

“格勒诺布尔和里昂都是效忠王室的城市,人民会起来反对他,使那儿变成一道插翅难飞的关卡。”

“格勒诺布尔会热情地为他大开城门的,全里昂的人也都会赶快出来欢迎的。相信我,我们同你们一样消息灵通;我们的警务部也象你们的一样效率高。要给你举一个例子来证明吗?就拿你这次到巴黎来说吧。你想瞒过我,尽管你的行踪只告诉了你的马车夫,可是我却得到了你的住址,证据是,你刚在桌子面前一坐下,我就来到了这儿。现在,假如你不介意,请拉一下铃再要一副刀叉碟子来,我们一同进餐吧。”

“真是这样!”维尔福惊奇地望着他的父亲回答,“你们的消息看来的确很灵通。”

“呃,事情很简单。你们当权的人所拥有的,只不过是金钱能收买到的东西,而我们在野人,却可以得到由信仰所激发的一切。”

“信仰?”维尔福微笑着说。

“不错,是信仰。那两个字的含义,我相信,就是有希望的雄心。”说完,维尔福的父亲伸手去准备拉那条叫人的铃绳,想叫侍者进来。维尔福却按住了他的手臂。

“等一等,我亲爱的父亲,青年说道,我再说一句话。”

“说吧。”

“不管保皇党的警务部多么无能,他们却知道一件可怕的事。”

“什么事?”

“就是有个人的外貌特征在奎斯奈将军失踪的那天早上到将军家里去过。”

“哦,能干的警务部知道了这件事,那个人的外貌特征什么样?”

“褐色的皮肤,头发,眉毛胡须,都是黑的,排胸扣的蓝色披风,钮扣上挂着荣誉团军官的玫瑰形勋章,戴阔边帽子,一支藤手杖。”

“啊,啊!他们知道了这一切?”诺瓦蒂埃说,“那么,为什么他们不捉住那个人?”

“因为昨天,或者前天,他们跟踪那人到高海隆路拐角上的时候,把他给跟丢了。”

“我说你们警备部是些脓包吗?”

“是的,或许他们迟早会捉到他的。”

“不错,”诺瓦蒂埃说,随即漫不经心地环四周看了看——“不错,假如这个人事先没有得到警告或许会被他们抓住的,但现在他已经得到了警告。”他微笑了一下又说,“因此他就要改变他的相貌和穿着了,说着他走到放梳妆品的桌子前面,在脸上擦了一些肥皂,拿起一把剃刀,用一只结实的手刮掉那险些给他添麻烦的胡子,因为它们是给警务部留下了非常明显的印象。维尔福惊奇地注视着他。

胡子刮掉了,诺瓦蒂埃又把他的头发重新整理了一下,然后,拿起一条放在一只打开着的旅行皮包上面的花领巾,打了上去,穿上了维尔福的一件燕尾服式的棕黑色的一衣,脱下了他自己那件高领蓝色披风,在镜子前面试,他又拿了他儿子的一顶狭边帽子,觉得非常合适;把手杖放在原先那个壁炉角落里,拿起一支细竹手杖,用他那有力的手虎虎地试了一下,这支细手杖是文雅代理法官走路时用的,拿着它更显得从容轻快,这是他的主要特征之一。

“好了”化完了妆以后,他转过身来寻着他惊讶得目瞪口呆的儿子说,“怎么样,你们警务部还能认出吗?”

“认不出来了,父亲。维尔福讷纳地说,“至少,我希望如此。”

“现在,我亲爱的孩子,”诺瓦蒂埃又说,“我留给你来照料这些东西,全凭你的谨慎来把它处理掉了。”

“哦,放心好了。”维尔福说。

“是,是的,我现在相信你的确说的不错,你真的救了我的命,但你放心,我很快就会向你报恩的。”

维尔福摇摇头。

“你不相信?”

“至少,我希望是您弄错了。”

“你愿不愿意在他面前当一个预言家呢?”

“讲祸事的预言家是不受宫廷欢迎的,父亲。”

“不错,但他们总有一天会得到报偿的,假如真的发生了第二次的复辟,你那时就可以成为一个伟人了。”

“好吧,我对国王该说些什么呢?”

“对他这样说:‘陛下,关于法国的形势,市民的舆论,军队的士气,您受骗了。那个在巴黎被您称为科西嘉岛的魔王,在内韦尔被冠以逆贼头衔的人,已经在里昂被人欢呼为波拿巴,在格勒诺布尔被尊为皇帝了。您以为他是在被围剿,被追逐,或将要被擒获了,但他却在迅速前进,就象他所养的鹰那样。

您所信赖的士兵都快要饿死,累死啦,他们随时都准备着开小差,然后象雪片附在向前滚的雪球似地赶到他那儿去。陛下,走吧!把法兰西让给它真正的主了吧,让给那个不是把它买到手,而是征服它的人吧。走吧,陛下,倒并不是因为您会遇到什么危险,因为您的对手很强大,会宽容您的,面对圣·路易的孙子来说,竟让那个打赢了阿柯尔战役,马伦戈战役,奥斯特利茨战役的那个人饶他一命未免也太丢脸了。’就对他这样说,或者,最好还是什么也不要告诉他。把你这次行程严守秘密,别吹嘘你到巴黎来干什么,或曾干了什么。赶快回去,在黑夜里进入马赛,从后门溜回家,静静地,服服贴贴地,不声不响地呆在那儿,而最重要的,就是不要惹人讨厌,因为这一次,我敢向你保证,我们认清了谁是敌人以后要给以狠狠的惩罚的。

走吧,我的儿子,走吧,我亲爱的杰拉尔,假如你能听从我的话或者如果你高兴,把它算作友好的忠告也行,我们还可以保留你的原职的。这个,”诺瓦蒂埃微笑了一下又说,“就算是一种交易吧,假如有一天,在政治的天平上你高我低的时候,还希望你再救我一命。再见了,我亲爱的杰拉尔,下次再来时,请在我的门口下车。”诺瓦蒂埃在讲这番话后,他便以同样安祥的态度离开了房间。维尔福脸色苍白,急忙奔到窗前,撩开窗帘,看着他泰然自若地走过街口两三个鬼头鬼脑的人的身边,这两三个人,也许就是等候在那儿来抓一个长黑胡子的,穿蓝色披风,戴阔边呢帽的人的。

维尔福屏息静气地站在那儿呆望着,直望到他的父亲拐入了蒲赛街。然后他转过身来急忙去处理他留下来的那堆东西,把那黑领结和蓝披风塞进旅行包的箱底里,把帽子仍进了黑洞洞的壁厨里,把手杖折成几段,一下子投进了壁炉,然后戴上他的旅行便帽,叫仆人来,用眼色示意让他不要提任何问题,付了饭店的账,跳上那辆早已等候着的马车里,他在里昂得知波拿巴已进入格勒诺布尔,沿途到处都是兵荒马乱的,他终于到达马赛,这个野心勃勃的人初尝成功的喜悦,但同时,他心中又充满了种种希望和忧虑。

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