第004章 阴谋
大耳朵英语  http://www.bigear.cn  2008-04-25 11:22:18  【打印
The Count of Monte Cristo

Chapter 4 Conspiracy





DANGLARS followed Edmond and Mercédès with his eyes until the two lovers disappeared behind one of the angles of Fort Saint Nicolas, then turning round, he perceived Fernand, who had fallen, pale and trembling, into his chair, while Caderousse stammered out the words of a drinking-song.

"Well, my dear sir," said Danglars to Fernand, "here is a marriage which does not appear to make everybody happy."

"It drives me to despair," said Fernand.

"Do you, then, love Mercédès?"

"I adore her!"

"For long?"

"As long as I have known her--always."

"And you sit there, tearing your hair, instead of seeking to remedy your condition; I did not think that was the way of your people."

"What would you have me do?" said Fernand.

"How do I know? Is it my affair? I am not in love with Mademoiselle Mercédès; but for you--in the words of the gospel, seek, and you shall find."

"I have found already."

"What?"

"I would stab the man, but the woman told me that if any misfortune happened to her betrothed, she would kill herself."

"Pooh! Women say those things, but never do them."

"You do not know Mercédès; what she threatens she will do."

"Idiot!" muttered Danglars; "whether she kill herself or not, what matter, provided Dantès is not captain?"

"Before Mercédès should die," replied Fernand, with the accents of unshaken resolution, "I would die myself!"

"That's what I call love!" said Caderousse with a voice more tipsy than ever. "That's love, or I don't know what love is."

"Come," said Danglars, "you appear to me a good sort of fellow, and hang me, I should like to help you, but"--

"Yes," said Caderousse, "but how?"

"My dear fellow," replied Danglars, "you are three parts drunk; finish the bottle, and you will be completely so. Drink then, and do not meddle with what we are discussing, for that requires all one's wit and cool judgment."

"I--drunk!" said Caderousse; "well that's a good one! I could drink four more such bottles; they are no bigger than cologne flasks. Père Pamphile, more wine!" and Caderousse rattled his glass upon the table.

"You were saving, sir"--said Fernand, awaiting with great anxiety the end of this interrupted remark.

"What was I saying? I forget. This drunken Caderousse has made me lose the thread of my sentence."

"Drunk, if you like; so much the worse for those who fear wine, for it is because they have bad thoughts which they are afraid the liquor will extract from their hearts;" and Caderousse began to sing the two last lines of a song very popular at the time,--

'Tous les mechants sont beuveurs d'eau;

C'est bien prouve par le deluge.' [1]

"You said, sir, you would like to help me, but"--

"Yes; but I added, to help you it would be sufficient that Dantès did not marry her you love; and the marriage may easily be thwarted, methinks, and yet Dantès need not die."

"Death alone can separate them," remarked Fernand.

"You talk like a noodle, my friend," said Caderousse; "and here is Danglars, who is a wide-awake, clever, deep fellow, who will prove to you that you are wrong. Prove it, Danglars. I have answered for you. Say there is no need why Dantès should die; it would, indeed, be a pity he should. Dantès is a good fellow; I like Dantès. Dantès, your health."

Fernand rose impatiently. "Let him run on," said Danglars, restraining the young man; "drunk as he is, he is not much out in what he says. Absence severs as well as death, and if the walls of a prison were between Edmond and Mercédès they would be as effectually separated as if he lay under a tombstone."

"Yes; but one gets out of prison," said Caderousse, who, with what sense was left him, listened eagerly to the conversation, "and when one gets out and one's name is Edmond Dantès, one seeks revenge"--

"What matters that?" muttered Fernand.

"And why, I should like to know," persisted Caderousse, "should they put Dantès in prison? he has not robbed or killed or murdered."

"Hold your tongue!" said Danglars.

"I won't hold my tongue!" replied Caderousse; "I say I want to know why they should put Dantès in prison; I like Dantès; Dantès, your health!" and he swallowed another glass of wine.

Danglars saw in the muddled look of the tailor the progress of his intoxication, and turning towards Fernand, said, "Well, you understand there is no need to kill him."

"Certainly not, if, as you said just now, you have the means of having Dantès arrested. Have you that means?"

"It is to be found for the searching. But why should I meddle in the matter? it is no affair of mine.";

"I know not why you meddle," said Fernand, seizing his arm; "but this I know, you have some motive of personal hatred against Dantès, for he who himself hates is never mistaken in the sentiments of others."

"I!--motives of hatred against Dantès? None, on my word! I saw you were unhappy, and your unhappiness interested me; that's all; but since you believe I act for my own account, adieu, my dear friend, get out of the affair as best you may;" and Danglars rose as if he meant to depart.

"No, no," said Fernand, restraining him, "stay! It is of very little consequence to me at the end of the matter whether you have any angry feeling or not against Dantès. I hate him! I confess it openly. Do you find the means, I will execute it, provided it is not to kill the man, for Mercédès has declared she will kill herself if Dantès is killed."

Caderousse, who had let his head drop on the table, now raised it, and looking at Fernand with his dull and fishy eyes, he said,--"Kill Dantès! who talks of killing Dantès? I won't have him killed--I won't! He's my friend, and this morning offered to share his money with me, as I shared mine with him. I won't have Dantès killed--I won't!"

"And who has said a word about killing him, muddlehead?" replied Danglars. "We were merely joking; drink to his health," he added, filling Caderousse's glass, "and do not interfere with us."

"Yes, yes, Dantès' good health!" said Caderousse, emptying his glass, "here's to his health! his health--hurrah!"

"But the means--the means?" said Fernand.

"Have you not hit upon any?" asked Danglars.

"No!--you undertook to do so."

"True," replied Danglars; "the French have the superiority over the Spaniards, that the Spaniards ruminate, while the French invent."

"Do you invent, then," said Fernand impatiently.

"Waiter," said Danglars, "pen, ink, and paper."

"Pen, ink, and paper," muttered Fernand.

"Yes; I am a supercargo; pen, ink, and paper are my tools, and without my tools I am fit for nothing."

"Pen, ink, and paper, then," called Fernand loudly. "There's what you want on that table," said the waiter.

"Bring them here." The waiter did as he was desired.

"When one thinks," said Caderousse, letting his hand drop on the paper, "there is here wherewithal to kill a man more sure than if we waited at the corner of a wood to assassinate him! I have always had more dread of a pen, a bottle of ink, and a sheet of paper, than of a sword or pistol."

"The fellow is not so drunk as he appears to be," said Danglars. "Give him some more wine, Fernand." Fernand filled Caderousse's glass, who, like the confirmed toper he was, lifted his hand from the paper and seized the glass.

The Catalan watched him until Caderousse, almost overcome by this fresh assault on his senses, rested, or rather dropped, his glass upon the table.

"Well!" resumed the Catalan, as he saw the final glimmer of Caderousse's reason vanishing before the last glass of wine.

"Well, then, I should say, for instance," resumed Danglars, "that if after a voyage such as Dantès has just made, in which he touched at the Island of Elba, some one were to denounce him to the king's procureur as a Bonapartist agent" --

"I will denounce him!" exclaimed the young man hastily.

"Yes, but they will make you then sign your declaration, and confront you with him you have denounced; I will supply you with the means of supporting your accusation, for I know the fact well. But Dantès cannot remain forever in prison, and one day or other he will leave it, and the day when he comes out, woe betide him who was the cause of his incarceration!"

"Oh, I should wish nothing better than that he would come and seek a quarrel with me."

"Yes, and Mercédès! Mercédès, who will detest you if you have only the misfortune to scratch the skin of her dearly beloved Edmond!"

"True!" said Fernand.

"No, no," continued Danglars; "if we resolve on such a step, it would be much better to take, as I now do, this pen, dip it into this ink, and write with the left hand (that the writing may not be recognized) the denunciation we propose." And Danglars, uniting practice with theory, wrote with his left hand, and in a writing reversed from his usual style, and totally unlike it, the following lines, which he handed to Fernand, and which Fernand read in an undertone:--

"The honorable, the king's attorney, is informed by a friend of the throne and religion, that one Edmond Dantès, mate of the ship Pharaon, arrived this morning from Smyrna, after having touched at Naples and Porto-Ferrajo, has been intrusted by Murat with a letter for the usurper, and by the usurper with a letter for the Bonapartist committee in Paris. Proof of this crime will be found on arresting him, for the letter will be found upon him, or at his father's, or in his cabin on board the Pharaon."

"Very good," resumed Danglars; "now your revenge looks like common-sense, for in no way can it revert to yourself, and the matter will thus work its own way; there is nothing to do now but fold the letter as I am doing, and write upon it, 'To the king's attorney,' and that's all settled." And Danglars wrote the address as he spoke.

"Yes, and that's all settled!" exclaimed Caderousse, who, by a last effort of intellect, had followed the reading of the letter, and instinctively comprehended all the misery which such a denunciation must entail. "Yes, and that's all settled; only it will be an infamous shame;" and he stretched out his hand to reach the letter.

"Yes," said Danglars, taking it from beyond his reach; "and as what I say and do is merely in jest, and I, amongst the first and foremost, should be sorry if anything happened to Dantès--the worthy Dantès--look here!" And taking the letter, he squeezed it up in his hands and threw it into a corner of the arbor.

"All right!" said Caderousse. "Dantès is my friend, and I won't have him ill-used."

"And who thinks of using him ill? Certainly neither I nor Fernand," said Danglars, rising and looking at the young man, who still remained seated, but whose eye was fixed on the denunciatory sheet of paper flung into the corner.

"In this case," replied Caderousse, "let's have some more wine. I wish to drink to the health of Edmond and the lovely Mercédès."

"You have had too much already, drunkard," said Danglars; "and if you continue, you will be compelled to sleep here, because unable to stand on your legs."

"I?" said Caderousse, rising with all the offended dignity of a drunken man, "I can't keep on my legs? Why, I'll wager I can go up into the belfry of the Accoules, and without staggering, too!"

"Done!" said Danglars, "I'll take your bet; but to-morrow--to-day it is time to return. Give me your arm, and let us go."

"Very well, let us go," said Caderousse; "but I don't want your arm at all. Come, Fernand, won't you return to Marseilles with us?"

"No," said Fernand; "I shall return to the Catalans."

"You're wrong. Come with us to Marseilles--come along."

"I will not."

"What do you mean? you will not? Well, just as you like, my prince; there's liberty for all the world. Come along, Danglars, and let the young gentleman return to the Catalans if he chooses."

Danglars took advantage of Caderousse's temper at the moment, to take him off towards Marseilles by the Porte Saint-Victor, staggering as he went.

When they had advanced about twenty yards, Danglars looked back and saw Fernand stoop, pick up the crumpled paper, and putting it into his pocket then rush out of the arbor towards Pillon.

"Well," said Caderousse, "why, what a lie he told! He said he was going to the Catalans, and he is going to the city. Hallo, Fernand!"

"Oh, you don't see straight," said Danglars; "he's gone right enough."

"Well," said Caderousse, "I should have said not--how treacherous wine is!"

"Come, come," said Danglars to himself, "now the thing is at work and it will effect its purpose unassisted."



基督山伯爵 第四章 阴谋



腾格拉尔的眼睛一直随着爱德蒙和美塞苔丝,直到他们消失在圣·尼古拉堡的一个拐角处才回过头来仔细地观察弗尔南多,弗尔南多已经倒在椅子里,脸色苍白,浑身发抖,卡德鲁斯正在一边含糊地唱歌一边喝酒。

“我亲爱的先生,”腾格拉尔对弗尔南多说,“这桩婚事,并不能使人人快活。”

“它使人失望。”弗尔南多说。

“那么,你也爱美塞苔丝吗?”

“我崇拜她!”

“你爱上她很久了吗?”

“从第一次见她,我就爱上她了。”

“既然这样,那么你为什么不去想个补救的办法。见鬼,我想不到你们迦太人会这样窝囊。”

“你叫我怎么办”弗尔南多说。

“我怎么知道?这是我的事吗?又不是我爱上了美塞苔丝小姐——是你。‘找吧,’福音书上说,‘你总会找到的。’”

“我已经找到了。”

“什么?”

“我要杀了那个男的,那个女人曾经对我说,如果她的未婚夫遭到什么不幸,她就会自杀的。”

“得了吧,人都会这么说的,但决不会真的去做的。”

“你不了解美塞苔丝,她是说得出来,就做得到的。”

“傻瓜!”腾格拉尔自言自语地说,“只要唐太斯当不上船长就行,她自杀不自杀跟我有什么关系?”

“如果美塞苔丝死了,”弗尔南多语气坚决地说,“那我也情愿死。”

“这就是我所说的爱情!”卡德鲁斯说,他的口齿比刚才更加含糊不清了,“这是爱情!,否则我就不知道爱情究竟是什么了。”

“喂,”腾格拉尔说,“我看你倒是个老实人,活该我倒霉,我倒愿意帮你的忙,可是——”

“喂,”卡德鲁斯说,“可是什么?”

“亲爱的人,”腾格拉尔回答说,“你现在已经醉得差不多了,喝光这一瓶,你就会烂醉了,去喝吧,别来打扰我们的事情,因为这事得动一下脑筋才能冷静地下判断。”

“我喝酒!”卡德鲁斯说,“好,那倒不错!这种酒瓶还没有香水瓶子大,我能喝上四瓶,邦费勒老爹,再拿点酒来!”卡德鲁斯用他的酒杯敲着桌子嚷道。

“先生,你刚才说——?”弗尔南多等这一段插话一说完就着急的问道。

“我刚才说什么来着?我怎么想不起来。卡德鲁斯这个酒鬼把我的思路给打断了。”

“爱喝就喝,那些怕酒的人就不敢喝,因为他们心里怀着鬼胎,怕给酒勾出来。”卡德鲁斯此时又哼起了当时一首极流行的歌曲的最后两句来:

坏蛋个个都喝水,

洪水可以做证人

“先生,你刚才说你很愿意帮我的忙,就是——”

“对了,就是我附带说一句,我帮你的忙,只要唐太斯娶不到你所爱的那个人就算了,我看,那件事是不难办到的,只是不必非把唐太斯置于死地。”

“只有死才能拆开他们。”弗尔南多说。“看你讲话的这个样子,真象一个呆子,朋友,”卡德鲁斯说,“这位是腾格拉尔,他是一个诡计多端的智多星,他马上就能证明你错了,证明给他看,腾格拉尔。我来代你回答吧。唐太斯不一定非死不可,假如他死了,也实在太可惜了,唐太斯是个好人。我喜欢唐太斯。唐太斯,祝你健康!”

弗尔南多不耐烦地站起来。“让他去说吧。”腾格拉尔按住那青年说,“他虽喝醉了,但讲的话倒也不失道理。分离和死亡会产生同样的结果,假如爱德蒙和美塞苔丝之间隔着一道监狱的墙,那么他们不得不分手,其结果与让他躺的坟墓里一样的。”

“不错,但关在牢里的人是会出来的,”卡德鲁斯说,他凭着尚存的一些理智仍在努力倾听着谈话,“而他一旦出来,象爱德蒙·唐太斯这样的人,他报起仇来——”

“那有什么可怕?”弗尔南多轻声地说。

“噢,我倒知道,”卡德鲁斯说,“凭什么把唐太斯关到牢里去?他又没有抢劫,杀人,害人。”

“闭嘴。”腾格拉尔说。

“我就不闭嘴!”卡德鲁斯继续说,“凭什么关系把唐太斯关到牢里去。我喜欢唐太斯。唐太斯我祝你健康!”他又喝了一杯酒。

腾格拉尔看到那裁缝的神色已经恍恍惚惚了,知道酒性已经发作了,便转过去,对弗尔南多说:“喂,你知道没人非要让他死不可。”

“那当然了,假如象你刚才所说的那样,你有办法可以使唐太斯被捕,那当然就没有这个必要了。你有办法吗?”

“只要去找,总是有办法的?”

“我不知道这事究竟是否与你有关,”弗尔南多抓住他的手臂说,“但我知道,你对唐太斯也一定怀有某种私怨,因为心怀怨恨的人是决不会看错别人的情绪的。”

“我?我怀有恨唐太斯的动机?不!我发誓!我是看到你很不快活,而我又很关心你,仅此而已,既然你认为我怀有什么私心,那就再见吧,我亲爱的朋友,你自己想办法解决这事吧。”腾格拉尔站起来装作要走的样子。

“不,不,”弗尔南多拉住他的手说,“请别走!你究竟恨不恨唐太斯与我没有关系。我是恨他!我可以公开宣布恨他。只要你能有办法,我就来干,——只要不杀了他就行,因为美塞苔斯曾说过,假如唐太斯死了,她也要去自杀。”

卡德鲁斯本来已把头伏在桌子上,现在忽然抬起头来,用他那迟钝无光的眼睛望着弗尔南多说:“杀唐太斯!谁说要杀唐太斯?我不愿意他死——我不愿意!他是我的朋友,今天早上还说要借钱给我,象我借给他一样。我不许人杀唐太斯——我不许!”

“谁说过要杀他了,你这傻瓜!”腾格拉尔答道。“我们只是开开玩笑而已,喝杯酒,祝他身体健康吧,”他给卡德鲁斯倒满了酒,又说,“别来打扰我们。”

“对,对,为唐太斯身体健康干杯!”卡德鲁斯把酒一饮而尽说,“这杯祝他身体健康祝他健康!嗨!”

“可是办法,——办法呢?”弗尔南多说。

“你还一点也想不起来吗?”

“没有,办法得由你想。”

“真的,”腾格拉尔说道,“法国人比西班牙人强,西班牙人还在苦苦思考之时,法国人则一拍脑袋主意就来了。”

“那么你有主意了吗?”弗尔南多不耐烦地说。

“伙计,”腾格拉尔说。“把笔墨纸张拿过来。”

“笔墨纸张?”弗尔南多咕哝的说。

“是的,我是一个押运员。笔墨和纸张是我的工具,没有工具我是什么事都做不了的。”

“把笔墨纸张拿来!”弗尔南多大声喊道。

“都在那张桌子上。”侍者指指文具说。

“拿到这儿来。”

侍者听命给他拿了过来。

卡德鲁斯手按着纸说:“想到用这东西杀人比候在树林旁边暗杀还要牢靠,也太令人寒心了!我一向就害怕笔、墨水和纸,比害怕刀剑或手枪还要厉害。”

“这家伙看来并不象他外表那样醉的厉害,”腾格拉尔说,“再灌他几杯,弗尔南多。”

弗尔南多又给卡德鲁斯斟满酒,后者原是一个酒徒,一看见酒,便放开了纸,抓起了酒杯。那迦太兰人一直看着卡德鲁斯,直看到他在这次进攻之下毫无招架之力,把酒杯象掉下来似的放到桌上为止。

“好了!”那迦太兰人看到卡德鲁斯最后的一点理智也消失在这杯酒里了,才又继续说道。

“好了,那么,譬如说,”腾格拉尔重又继续说道,“唐太斯现在刚刚航海回来,途中又在厄尔巴岛靠过,这次航海以后,假如有人向检察官告发,说他是一个拿破仑党的眼线的话——”

“我去告发他!”青年连忙喊道。

“好的,但这样他们就会叫你在告发书上签名的,还叫你和被告对质,我可以给你提供告发他的资料,因为我对于事实知道得很清楚。但唐太斯不会在牢里给关一辈子的,总有一天他会出来的。他一出来,必定要找那个使他入狱的人报仇的。”

“嘿,我就盼着他来找我打架呢。”

“是的,可是美塞苔丝,——美塞苔丝呢,只要你碰破她心爱的爱德蒙一层皮,她就会痛恨你的呀!”

“一点不错!”弗尔南多说。

“不行,不能这样做!”腾格拉尔继续说,“但是假如我们决定采取我现在所说的这个办法,那就好得多了,只要这支笔,蘸着这瓶墨水,用左手(那样笔迹就不会被人认出来)写一封告密信就得了。”腾格拉尔一面说着一面写了起来,他用左手写下了几行歪歪斜斜的根本看不出是他自己的笔迹的文字,然后他把那篇文字交给弗尔南多,弗尔南多低声读道:“检察官先生台鉴,敝人拥护王室及教会之人士,兹向您报告有爱德蒙·唐太斯其人,系法老号之大副,今晨自士麦拿经那不勒斯抵埠,中途曾停靠费拉约港。此人受缪拉之命送信与逆贼,并受逆贼命送信与巴黎拿破仑党委员会。犯罪证据在将其逮捕时即可获得,信件不是在其身上,就是在其父家中,或者在法老号上他的船舱里。”

“好极了,”腾格拉尔说,“这样你的报仇就不会被人知道了,这封信自可生效,而且肯定追究不到你的头上来的。没什么别的事了,只要象我这样把信折叠起来,写上‘呈交皇家检察官阁下’,一切就都解决了。”腾格拉尔一面说着,一面把收信人的姓名地址都写在了上面。

“不错,一切都解决了!”卡德鲁斯喊道,他凭着最后一点清醒已听到了那封信的内容,知道如果这样一去告密,会出现什么样的后果,“不错,一切都解决了,只是这样做太可耻了,太不名誉了!”他伸手想拿那封信。

“是的,”腾格拉尔说,一面把信移开了,使他拿不到,“我刚才所说所做的不过是开开玩笑而已,假如唐太斯,这位可敬的唐太斯遭到了什么不幸,我会第一个感到难过的,你看,”他拿起了那封信,把它揉成一团,抛向凉棚的一个角落里。

“这就对了!”卡德鲁斯说。“唐太斯是我的朋友,我可不能让他被人陷害。”

“哪个鬼家伙想陷害他?肯定不是我,弗尔南多也不会!”

腾格拉尔说着便站了起来望了一眼那个青年,青年依旧坐着,但眼睛却盯在了那被抛在角落里的告密信上。

“既然这样,”卡德鲁斯说道,“我们再来喝点酒吧。我想再喝几杯来祝德爱德蒙和那可爱的美塞苔丝健康。”

“你已经喝得不少了啦,酒鬼,”腾格拉尔说,“你要是再喝,就得睡在这儿了,因为你连站都站不起来了。”

“我喝多了。”卡德鲁斯一面说,一面带着一个醉鬼被冒犯时的那副样子站了起来,“我站不起来了?我跟你打赌,我能一口气跑上阿歌兰史教堂的钟楼,连脚步都不会乱!”

“好吧!”腾格拉尔说,“我跟你打赌,不过等明天吧,——今天该回去了。我们走吧,我来扶你。”

“很好,我们这就走,”卡德鲁斯说,“但我可用不着你来扶。走,弗尔南多,你不和我们一块儿回马赛吗?”

“不,”弗尔南多回答,“我回迦太兰村。”

“你错啦。跟我们一起到马赛去吧,走吧。”

“我不去。”

“你这是什么意思?你不去?好,随你的便吧,我的小伙子,在这个世界上人人都是自由的。走吧,腾格拉尔,随那位先生的便罢,他高兴就让他回迦太兰村去好了。”

腾格拉尔这时是很愿意顺着卡德鲁斯的脾气行事的,他扶着他踉踉跄跄地沿着胜利港向马赛走去。

他们大约向前走了二十码左右,腾格拉尔回过头来,看见弗尔南多正在弯腰捡起那张揉皱的纸,并塞进他的口袋里,然后冲出凉棚,向皮隆方面奔去。

“咦,”卡德鲁斯说,“看,他多会撒谎!他说要回迦太兰村去,可却朝城里那个方向走去了。喂,弗尔南多!”

“唔,是你弄错了,”腾格拉尔说,“他一点没错。”

“噢,”卡德鲁斯说,“我还以为他走错了呢,酒这东西真会骗人!”

“哼,”腾格拉尔心里想,“这件事我看开端还不错,现在只待静观它的发展了。”

文章来源:大耳朵英语--免费实用 http://www.bigear.cn