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melancholic/[]/ n. 忧郁症患者 a. 忧郁的 ...

呼啸山庄 第六章

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Chapter 6



Mr Hindley came home to the funeral; and--a thing that amazed us, and set the neighbours gossiping right and left--he brought a wife with him. What she was, and where she was born, he never informed us: probably she had neither money nor name to recommend her, or he would scarcely have kept the union from his father.

She was not one that would have disturbed the house much on her own account. Every object she saw, the moment she crossed the threshold, appeared to delight her; and every circumstance that took place about her: except the preparing for the burial, and the presence of the mourners. I thought she was half silly, from her behaviour while that went on: she ran into her chamber, and made me come with her, though I should have been dressing the children; and there she sat shivering and clasping her hands, and asking repeatedly: `Are they gone yet?' Then she began describing with hysterical emotion the effect it produced on her to see black; and started, and trembled, and, at last, fell a-weeping-and when I asked what was the matter? answered, she didn't know; but she felt so afraid of dying! I imagined her as little likely to die as myself. She was rather thin, but young, and fresh-complexioned, and her eyes sparkled as bright as diamonds. I did remark, to be sure, that mounting the stairs made her breathe very quick: that the least sudden noise set her all in a quiver, and that she coughed troublesomely sometimes: but I knew nothing of what these symptoms portended, and had no impulse to sympathize with her. We don't in general take to foreigners here, Mr Lockwood, unless they take to us first.

Young Earnshaw was altered considerably in the three years of his absence. He had grown sparer, and lost his colour, and spoke and dressed quite differently; and, on the very day of his return, he told Joseph and me we must thenceforth quarter ourselves in the back kitchen, and leave the house for him. Indeed, he would have carpeted and papered a small spare room for a parlour; but his wife expressed such pleasure at the white floor and huge glowing fireplace, at the pewter dishes and delf case, and dog kennel, and the wide space there was to move about in where they usually sat, that he thought it unnecessary to her comfort, and so dropped the intention.

She expressed pleasure, too, at finding a sister among her new acquaintance; and she prattled to Catherine, and kissed her, and ran about with her, and gave her quantities of presents, at the beginning. Her affection tired very soon, however, and when she grew peevish, Hindley became tyrannical. A few words from her, evincing a dislike to Heathcliff, were enough to rouse in him all his old hatred of the boy. He drove him from their company to the servants, deprived him of the instructions of the curate, and insisted that he should labour out of doors instead; compelling him to do so as hard as any other lad on the farm.

Heathcliff bore his degradation pretty well at first, because Cathy taught him what she learnt, and worked or played with him in the fields. They both promised fair to grow up as rude as savages; the young master being entirely negligent how they behaved, and what they did, so they kept clear of him. He would not even have seen after their going to church on Sundays, only Joseph and the curate reprimanded his carelessness when they absented themselves; and that reminded him to order Heathcliff a flogging, and Catherine a fast from dinner or supper. But it was one of their chief amusements to run away to the moors in the morning and remain there all day, and the after punishment grew a mere thing to laugh at. The curate might set as many chapters as he pleased for Catherine to get by heart, and Joseph might thrash Heathcliff till his arm ached; they forgot everything the minute they were together again: at least the minute they had contrived some naughty plan of revenge; and many a time I've cried to myself to watch them growing more reckless daily, and I not daring to speak a syllable, for fear of losing the small power I still retained over the unfriended creatures. One Sunday evening, it chanced that they were banished from the sitting-room, for making a noise, or a light offence of the kind; and when I went to call them to supper, I could discover them nowhere. We searched the house, above and below, and the yard and stables; they were invisible: and at last, Hindley in a passion told us to bolt the doors, and swore nobody should let them in that night. The household went to bed; and I' too anxious to lie down, opened my lattice and put my head out to hearken, though it rained: determined to admit them in spite of the prohibition, should they return. In a while, I distinguished steps coming up the road, and the light of a lantern glimmered through the gate. I threw a shawl over my head and ran to prevent them from waking Mr Earnshaw by knocking. There was Heathcliff, by himself: it gave me a start to see him alone.

`Where is Miss Catherine?' I cried hurriedly. `No accident, I hope?'

`At Thrushcross Grange,' he answered; `and I would have been there too, but they had not the manners to ask me to stay. `Well, you will catch it!' I said: `you'll never be content till you're sent about your business. What in the world led you wandering to Thrushcross Grange?'

`Let me get off my wet clothes, and I'll tell you all about it, Nelly,' he replied. I bid him beware of rousing the master, and while he undressed and I waited to put out the candle, he continued--`Cathy and I escaped from the wash-house to have a ramble at liberty, and getting a glimpse of the Grange lights, we thought we would just go and see whether the Lintons passed their Sunday evenings standing shivering in corners, while their father and mother sat eating and drinking, and singing and laughing; and burning their eyes out before the fire. Do you think they do? Or reading sermons, and being catechized by their manservant, and set to learn a column of Scripture names, if they don't answer properly?'

`Probably not,' I responded. `They are good children, no doubt, and don't deserve the treatment you receive, for your bad conduct.'

`Don't you cant, Nelly,' he said: `nonsense! We ran from the top of the Heights to the park, without stopping--Catherine completely beaten in the race, because she was barefoot. You'll have to seek for her shoes in the bog tomorrow. We crept through a broken hedge, groped our way up the path, and planted ourselves on a flower plot under the drawing-room window. The light came from thence; they had not put up the shutters, and the curtains were only half closed. Both of us were able to look in by standing on the basement, and clinging to the ledge, and we saw--ah! it was beautiful--a splendid place carpeted with crimson, and crimson-covered chairs and tables, and a pure white ceiling bordered by gold, a shower of glass drops hanging in silver chains from the centre, and shimmering with little soft tapers. Old Mr and Mrs Linton were not there; Edgar and his sister had it entirely to themselves. Shouldn't they have been happy? We should have thought ourselves in heaven! And now, guess what your good children were doing? Isabella--I believe she is eleven, a year younger than Cathy--lay screaming at the farther end of the room, shrieking as if witches were running red-hot needles into her. Edgar stood on the hearth weeping silently, and in the middle of the table sat a little dog, shaking its paw and yelping; which, from their mutual accusations, we understood they had nearly pulled in two between them. The idiots! That was their pleasure! to quarrel who should hold a heap of warm hair, and each begin to cry because both, after struggling to get it, refused to take it. We laughed outright at the petted things; we did despise them! When would you catch me wishing to have what Catherine wanted? or find us by ourselves, seeking entertainment in yelling, and sobbing, and rolling on the ground, divided by the whole room? I'd not exchange, for a thousand lives, my condition here, for Edgar Linton's at Thrushcross Grange--not if I might have the privilege of flinging--Joseph off the highest gable, and painting the house-front with Hindley's blood!'

`Hush, hush!' I interrupted. `Still you have not told me, Heathcliff, how Catherine is left behind?'

`I told you we laughed,' he answered. `The Lintons heard us, and with one accord, they shot like arrows to the door; there was silence, and then a cry, "Oh, mamma, mamma! Oh, papa! Oh, mamma, come here. Oh, papa, oh!" They really did howl out something in that way. We made frightful noises to terrify them still more, and then we dropped off the ledge, because somebody was drawing the bars, and we felt we had better flee. I had Cathy by the hand, and was urging her on, when all at once she fell down. "Run, Heathcliff, run!" she whispered. "They have let the bulldog loose, and he holds me!" The devil had seized her ankle, Nelly: I heard his abominable snorting. She did not yell out--no! she would have scorned to do it, if she had been spitted on the horns of a mad cow. I did, though! I vociferated curses enough to annihilate any fiend in Christendom; and I got a store and thrust it between his jaws, and tried with all my might to cram it down his throat. A beast of a servant came up with a lantern, at last, shouting--"Keep fast, Skulker, keep fast!" He changed his note, however--when he saw Skulker's game. The dog was throttled off; his huge, purple tongue hanging half a foot out of his mouth, and his pendent lips streaming with bloody slaver. The man took Cathy up: she was sick: not from fear, I'm certain, but from pain. He carried her in; I followed, grumbling execrations and vengeance. "What prey, Robert?" hallooed Linton from the entrance. "Skulker has caught a little girl, sir," he replied; "and there's a lad here", he added, making a clutch at me, "who looks an out-and-outer! Very like, the robbers were for putting them through the window to open the doors to the gang after all were asleep, that they might murder us at their ease. Hold your tongue, you foul-mouthed thief, you! you shall go to the gallows for this. Mr Linton, sir, don't lay by your gun." "No, no, Robert," said the old fool. "The rascals knew that yesterday was my rent day: they thought to have me cleverly. Come in; I'll furnish them a reception. There, John, fasten the chain. Give Skulker some water, Jenny. To beard a magistrate in his stronghold, and on the Sabbath, too! Where will their insolence stop? Oh, my dear Mary, look here! Don't be afraid, it is but a boy--yet the villain scowls so plainly in his face; would it not be a kindness to the country to hang him at once, before he shows his nature in acts as well as features?" He pulled me under the chandelier, and Mrs Linton placed her spectacles on her nose and raised her hands in horror. The cowardly children crept nearer also, Isabella lisping--"Frightful thing! Put him in the cellar, papa. He's exactly like the son of the fortune-teller that stole my tame pheasant. Isn't he, Edgar?"

`While they examined me, Cathy came round; she heard the last speech, and laughed. Edgar Linton, after an inquisitive stare, collected sufficient wit to recognize her. They see us at church, you know, though we seldom meet them elsewhere. "That's Miss Earnshaw!" he whispered to his mother, "and look how Skulker has bitten her--how her foot bleeds!"

"Miss Earnshaw? Nonsense!" cried the dame; "Miss Earnshaw scouring the country with a gipsy! And yet, my dear, the child is in mourning--surely it is--and she may be lamed for life!"

"What culpable carelessness in her brother!" exclaimed Mr Linton, turning from me to Catherine. "I've understood from Shielders" (that was the curate, sir) "that he lets her grow up in absolute heathenism. But who is this? Where did she pick up this companion? Oho! I declare he is that strange acquisition my late neighbour made, in his journey to Liverpool--a little Lascar, or an American or Spanish castaway."

"A wicked boy, at all events," remarked the old lady, "and quite unfit for a decent house! Did you notice his language, Linton? I'm shocked that my children should have heard it."

`I recommenced cursing--don't be angry, Nelly--and so Robert was ordered to take me off. I refused to go without Cathy; he dragged me into the garden, pushed the lantern into my hand, assured me that Mr Earnshaw should be informed of my behaviour, and, bidding me march directly, secured the door again. The curtains were still looped up at one comer, and I resumed my station as spy; because, if Catherine had wished to return, I intended shattering their great glass panes to a million of fragments, unless they let her out. She sat on the sofa quietly. Mrs Linton took off the grey cloak of the dairymaid which we had borrowed for our excursion, shaking her head and expostulating with her, I suppose: she was a young lady, and they made a distinction between her treatment and mine. Then the woman-servant brought a basin of warm water, and washed her feet; and Mr Linton mixed a tumbler of negus, and Isabella emptied a plateful of cakes into her lap, and Edgar stood gaping at a distance. Afterwards, they dried and combed her beautiful hair, and gave her a pair of enormous slippers, and wheeled her to the fire; and I left her, as merry as she could be, dividing her food between the little dog and Skulker, whose nose she pinched as he ate; and kindling a spark of spirit in the vacant blue eyes of the Lintons--a dim reflection from her own enchanting face. I saw they were full of stupid admiration; she is so immeasurably superior to them--to everybody on earth, is she not, Nelly?'

`There will more come of this business than you reckon on,' I answered, covering him up and extinguishing the light. `You are incurable, Heathcliff; and Mr Hindley will have to proceed to extremities, see if he won't.' My words came truer than I desired. The luckless adventure made Earnshaw furious. And then Mr Linton, to mend matters, paid us a visit himself on the morrow; and read the young master such a lecture on the road he guided his family, that he was stirred to look about him, in earnest. Heathcliff received no flogging, but he was told that the first word he spoke to Miss Catherine should ensure a dismissal; and Mrs Earnshaw undertook to keep her sister-in-law in due restraint when she returned home; employing art, not force: with force she would have found it impossible.

第六章

辛德雷先生回家奔丧来了,而且——有一件事使我们大为惊讶,也使左邻右舍议论纷纷——他带来一个妻子。她是什么人,出生在哪儿,他从来没告诉我们。大概她既没有钱,也没有门第可夸,不然他也不至于把这个婚姻瞒着他父亲的。

她倒不是个为了自己而会搅得全家不安的人。她一跨进门槛,所见到的每样东西以及她周围发生的每项事情:除了埋葬的准备,和吊唁者临门外,看来都使她愉快。这时,我从她的举止看来,认为她有点疯疯癫癫的:她跑进卧室,叫我也进去,虽然我正该给孩子们穿上孝服,她却坐在那儿发抖,紧握着手,反复地问:“他们走了没有?”

然后,她就带着神经质的激动开始描述看见黑颜色会对她有什么影响,她吃惊,哆嗦,最后又哭起来——当我问她怎么回事时,她又回答说不知道,只是觉得非常怕死!我想她和我一样不至于就死的。她相当地瘦,可是年轻,气色挺好,一双眼睛像宝石似的发亮。我倒也确实注意到她上楼时呼吸急促,只要听见一点最轻微的突然的声响,就浑身发抖,而且有时候咳嗽得很烦人。可是我一点也不知道这些病预示着什么,也毫不同情她的冲动。在这里我们跟外地人一般是不大亲近的,洛克乌德先生,除非他们先跟我们亲近。

年轻的恩萧,一别三年,大大地变了。他瘦了些,脸上失去了血色,谈吐衣着都跟从前不同了。他回来那天,就吩咐约瑟夫和我从此要在后厨房安身,把大厅留给他。的确,他本想收拾出一间小屋铺上地毯,糊糊墙壁,当作客厅。可是他的妻子对那白木地板和那火光熊熊的大壁炉,对那些锡镴盘子和嵌磁的橱,还有狗窝,以及他们通常起坐时可以活动的这广阔的空间,表现出那样的喜爱,因此他想为了妻子的舒适而收拾客厅是多此一举,便放弃了这个念头。

她为能在新相识者中找到一个妹妹而表示高兴。开始时,她跟凯瑟琳说个没完,亲她,跟她跑来跑去,给她许多礼物。但是不多久,她的这种喜爱劲头就退了。当她变得乖戾的时候,辛德雷也变得暴虐了。她只要吐出几个字,暗示不喜欢希刺克厉夫,这就足以把他对这孩子的旧恨全都勾起来。他不许他跟大伙在一起,把他赶到佣人中间去,剥夺他从副牧师那儿受教诲的机会,坚持说他该在外面干活,强迫他跟庄园里其他的小伴子们一样辛苦地干活。

起初这孩子还很能忍受他的降级,因为凯蒂把她所学的都教给他,还陪他在地里干活或玩耍。他们都有希望会像粗野的野人一样成长。少爷完全不过问他们的举止和行动,所以他们也乐得躲开他。他甚至也没留意他们星期日是否去礼拜堂,只有约瑟夫和副牧师看见他们不在的时候,才来责备他的疏忽。这就提醒了他下令给希刺克厉夫一顿鞭子,让凯瑟琳饿一顿午饭或晚饭。但是从清早跑到旷野,在那儿待一整天,这已成为他们主要娱乐之一,随后的惩罚反而成了可笑的小事一件罢了。尽管副牧师随心所欲地留下多少章节叫凯瑟琳背诵,尽管约瑟夫把希刺克厉夫抽得胳臂痛,可是只要他们又聚在一起,或至少在他们筹划出什么报复的顽皮计划的那一分钟,他们就把什么都忘了。有多少次我眼看他们一天比一天胡来,只好自己哭,我又不敢说一个字,唯恐失掉我对于这两个举目无亲的小家伙还能保留的一点点权力。一个星期日晚上,他们碰巧又因为太吵或是这类的一个小过失,而被撵出了起坐间。当我去叫他们吃晚饭时,哪儿也找不到他们,我们搜遍了这所房子,楼上楼下,以及院子和马厩,连个影儿也没有。最后,辛德雷发着脾气,叫我们闩上各屋的门,发誓说这天夜里谁也不许放他们进来。全家都去睡了,我急得躺不住,便把我的窗子打开,伸出头去倾听着,虽然在下雨,我决定只要是他们回来,我就不顾禁令,让他们进来。过了一会,我听见路上有脚步声,一盏提灯的光一闪一闪地进了大门。我把围巾披在头上,跑去以防他们敲门把恩萧吵醒。原来是希刺克厉夫,只有他一个人——我看他只一个人回来可把我吓一跳。

“凯瑟琳小姐在哪儿?”我急忙叫道,“我希望没出事吧。”

“在画眉田庄,”他回答,“本来我也可以待在那儿,可是他们毫无礼貌,不留我。”

“好呀,你要倒霉啦!”我说,“一定要到人家叫你滚蛋,你才会死了心。你们怎么想起来荡到画眉田庄去了?”

“让我脱掉湿衣服,再告诉你怎么回事,耐莉。”他回答。

我叫他小心别吵醒了主人。当他正脱着衣服,我在等着熄灯时,他接着说:“凯蒂和我从洗衣房溜出来想自由自在地溜达溜达。我们瞅见了田庄的灯火,想去看看林惇他们在过星期日的晚上是不是站在墙角发抖,而他们的的父母却坐在那儿又吃又喝,又唱又笑,在火炉跟前烤火烤得眼珠都冒火了。你想林惇他们是这样的吗?或者在读经,而且给他们的男仆人盘问着,要是他们答得不正确,还要背一段圣经上的名字,是吗?”

“大概不会,”我回答,“他们当然是好孩子,不该像你们由于你们的坏行为而受惩罚。”

“别假正经,耐莉,”他说,“废话!我们从山庄顶上跑到庄园里,一步没停——凯瑟琳完全落在后面了,因为她是光着脚的。你明天得到泥沼地里去找她的鞋哩。我们爬过一个破篱笆,摸索上路,爬到客厅窗子下面的一个花坛上站在那儿。灯光从那儿照出来,他们还没有关上百叶窗,窗帘也只是半开半掩。我们俩站在墙根地上,手扒着窗台边,就能瞧到里面。我们看见——啊!可真美——一个漂亮辉煌的地方,铺着猩红色的地毯,桌椅也都有猩红色的套子,纯白的天花板镶着金边,一大堆玻璃坠子用银链子从天花板中间吊下来,许多光线柔和的小蜡烛照得它闪闪发光。老林惇先生和太太都不在那儿,只有埃德加和他妹妹霸占了这屋子。他们还不该快乐吗?换了是我们的话,都会以为自己到了天堂啦!可是哪,你猜猜你说的那些好孩子在干什么?伊莎贝拉——我相信她有十一岁,比凯蒂小一岁——躺在屋子那头尖声大叫,叫得好像是巫婆用烧得通红的针刺进她的身体似的。埃德加站在火炉边,不声不响地哭着,在桌子中间有一只小狗坐在那儿,抖着它的爪子,汪汪地叫。从他们双方的控诉听来,我们明白了他们差点儿把它扯成两半。呆了!这就是他们的乐趣!争执着该谁抱那堆暖和的软毛,而且两个都开始哭了,因为两个人争着抢它之后又都不肯要了。我们对这两个惯宝贝不禁笑出声来。我们真瞧不起他们!你几时瞅见我想要凯瑟琳要的东西来着,或是发现我们又哭又叫,在地上打滚,一间屋子一边一个,这样子玩法?就是再让我活一千次,我也不要拿我在这儿的地位和埃德加在画眉田庄的地位交换——就是让我有特权把约瑟夫从最高的屋尖上扔下来,而且在房子前面涂上辛德雷的血,我也不干!”

“嘘!嘘!”我打断他,“希刺克厉夫,你还没告诉我怎么把凯瑟琳撂下啦?”

“我告诉过你我们笑啦,”他回答,“林惇他们听见我们了,就一起像箭似的冲到门口,先是不吭声,跟着大嚷起来,‘啊,妈妈,妈妈!啊,爸爸!啊,妈妈!来呀!啊,爸爸,啊!’他们真的就那样号叫出来个什么东西。我们就做出可怕的声音好把他们吓得更厉害,然后我们就从窗台边上下来,因为有人在拉开门闩,我们觉得还是溜掉好些。我抓住凯蒂的手,拖着她跑,忽然一下子她跌倒了。‘跑吧,希刺克厉夫,跑吧,’她小声说。‘他们放开了牛头狗,它咬住我啦!’这个魔鬼咬住了她的脚踝了,耐莉,我听见它那讨厌的鼻音。她没有叫出声来——不!她就是戳在疯牛的角上,也不会叫的。可我喊啦,发出一顿足以灭绝基督王国里任何恶魔的咒骂,我捡到一块石头塞到它的嘴里,而且尽我所有的力量想把这石头塞进它的喉咙。一个像畜生似的佣人提个提灯来了,叫着:‘咬紧,狐儿①咬紧啦!’可是,当他看见狐儿的猎物,就改变了他的声调。狗被掐住了,它那紫色的大舌头从嘴边挂出来有半尺长,耷拉的嘴巴流着带血的口水。那个人把凯蒂抱起来。她昏倒了,不是出于害怕,我敢说,是痛的。他把她抱进去。我跟着,嘴里嘟囔着咒骂和要报仇的话。‘抓到什么啦,罗伯特?’林惇从大门口那儿喊着。‘先生,狐儿逮到一个小姑娘。’他回答,‘这儿还有个小子,’他又说,抓住了我,‘我倒像个内行哩!很像是强盗把他们送进窗户,好等大家都睡了,去开门放这一帮子进来,好从从容容地把我们干掉。闭嘴,你这满口下流的小偷,你!你就要为这事上绞架啦。林惇先生,你先别把枪收起来。’‘不,罗伯特,’那个老混蛋说,‘这些坏蛋知道昨天是我收租的日子,他们想巧妙地算计我。进来吧,我要招待他们一番。约翰,把链子锁紧。给狐儿点水喝,詹尼。竟敢冒犯一位长官,而且在他们公馆里,还是在安息日!他们的荒唐还有个完吗?啊,我亲爱的玛丽,瞧这儿!别害怕,只是一个男孩子——可是他脸上明摆着流氓相,他们相貌已经露出本性来了,趁他的行动还没表现出来,立刻把他绞死,不是给乡里做了件好事吗?’他把我拉到吊灯底下。林惇太太把眼镜戴在鼻梁上,吓得举起双手。胆小的孩子们也爬近一些,伊莎贝拉口齿不清地说着,‘可怕的东西!把他放到地窖里去吧,爸爸。他正像偷我那支驯雉的那个算命的儿子呀。不就是他吗,埃德加?’

①狐儿——狗名。

“他们正在审查我时,凯蒂过来了。她听见最后这句话,就大笑起来。埃德加·林惇好奇地直瞪她,总算不傻,把她认出来了。你知道,他们在教堂看见过我们,虽然我们很少在别的地方碰见他们。‘那是恩萧小姐!’他低声对他母亲说,‘瞧瞧狐儿把她咬成什么样,她的脚上血流得多厉害呀!’

“‘恩萧小姐?瞎扯!’那位太太嚷着。‘恩萧小姐跟个吉普赛人在乡里乱荡!可是,我亲爱的,这孩子在戴孝——当然是啦——她也许一辈子都残废啦!’

“‘她哥哥的粗心可真造孽!’林惇先生叹着,从我这儿又转过身去看凯瑟琳。‘我从希尔得斯那儿听说(先生,那就是副牧师),他听任她在真正的异教中长大。可这是谁呢?她从哪儿捡到了这样一个同伙?哦!我断定他——定是我那已故的邻人去利物浦旅行时带回来的那个奇怪的收获——一个东印度小水手,或是一个美洲人或西班牙人的弃儿。’

“‘不管是什么,反正是个坏孩子,’那个老太太说,‘而且对于一个体面人家十分不合适!你注意到他的话没有,林惇!想到我的孩子们听到这些话,我真吓得要命。’”

“我又开始咒骂了——别生气,耐莉——这样罗伯特就奉命把我带走。没有凯蒂我就是不肯走。他把我拖到花园里去,把提灯塞到我手里,告诉我,一定要把我的行为通知恩萧先生,而且,要我马上开步走,就又把门关紧了。窗帘还是拉开一边,我就再侦察一下吧,因为,要是凯瑟琳愿意回来的话,我就打算把他们的大玻璃窗敲成粉碎,除非他们让她出来。她安静地坐在沙发上。林惇太太把我们为了出游而借来的挤牛奶女人的外套给她脱下来,摇着头,我猜是劝她。她是一个小姐,他们对待她就和对待我大有区别了。然后女仆端来一盆温水,给她洗脚,林惇先生调了一大杯混合糖酒,伊莎贝拉把满满一盘饼干倒在她的怀里,而埃德加站得远远的,张大着嘴傻看。后来他们把她美丽的头发擦干,梳好,给她一双大拖鞋,用车把她挪到火炉边。我就丢下了她,因为她正高高兴兴地在把她的食物分给小狗和狐儿吃。它吃的时候,她还捏它的鼻子,而且使林惇一家人那些呆呆的蓝眼睛里燃起了一点生气勃勃的火花——是她自己的的迷人的脸所引出的淡淡的反映。我看他们都表现出呆气十足的赞赏神气,她比他们高超得没法比——超过世上每一个人,不是吗,耐莉?”

“这件事将比你所料想的严重得多呢。”我回答,给他盖好被,熄了灯。“你是没救啦,希刺克厉夫,辛德雷先生一定要走极端的,瞧他会不会吧。”

我的话比我所料想的更为灵验。这不幸的历险使恩萧大为光火。随后林惇先生,为了把事情补救一下,亲自在第二天早上来拜访我们,而且还给小主人做了一大段演讲,关于他领导的家庭走的什么路,说得他真的动了心。希刺克厉夫没有挨鞭子抽,可是得到吩咐:只要一开口跟凯瑟琳小姐说话,他就得被撵出去。恩萧夫人承担等小姑回家的时候给她相当约束的任务,用伎俩,不是用武力;用武力她会发现是行不通的。
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